WE BELIEVE
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Matters.
WELCOME TO THE BIG TENT
The Umbrella Organization for the voice of Outdoor Recreation in Washington State.

The power of the Big Tent  lies not with any individual or with any shiny advertising or marketing campaigns, but with the combined weight of dozens of organizations and agencies who believe in the collective value of outdoor recreation.

Washington State's Outdoor Recreation Economy Generates

View the 2020 Economic Analysis of Outdoor Recreation in Washington State for details

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#RecreateResponsibly to Protect Yourself, Others, and the Outdoors

During this public health crisis, spending time in outdoor spaces has become even more important for many Americans. Yet these unusual circumstances mean that all of us, from seasoned outdoor enthusiasts to families heading out to their local park for the first time, could use a little guidance about how to stay safe. The Recreate Responsibly guidelines offer a starting point for getting outside to keep yourself healthy and to maintain access to our parks, trails, and beaches. [ LEARN MORE ]


 

SPONSORS

We Represent Outdoor Recreation

REI Co-op fights climate change and advances equity in the industry with bold new product standards

REI News Room

SEATTLE –To collectively fight against climate change and advance equity in the industry, REI Co-op is engaging its more than 1,000 brand partners to advance more sustainable and inclusive business practices. The REI Product Impact Standards include the co-op’s expectations for how brands are addressing carbon reduction, inclusive marketing practices and cultural designs in the products they make and sell to REI.

Report confirms outdoor recreation is crucial to national and state economies

SNEWS

The numbers are in. The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) came out with its annual report today dissecting the importance of the outdoor economy across the nation. Officially an analysis of the agency's Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account, which measures "economic activity as well as the sales or receipts generated by outdoor recreational activities" across the country, the report laid out in clear terms just how crucial outdoor recreation remains to state economies from coast to coast. Across the board, the upshot was positive. The BEA's report found that outdoor recreation contributed to the economies of all 50 states and accounted for 2.1 percent ($459.8 billion) of current-dollar gross domestic product and $788 billion in gross output (consumer spending) in 2019.

NPS CAMPGROUND DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES -- Public Review Draft

National Parks Service

The NPS has undertaken a campground modernization strategy to ensure our second century of NPS campgrounds supports both visitors and employees. As part of this effort, an internal NPS team has developed draft design guidelines to centralize campground design information. These include details on spatial requirements for expanding campsites to accommodate RV use and guidelines on how to meet accessibility codes while maintaining cultural resource integrity. The guide will be a clearinghouse of best practices and design resources for all National Park Service staff and private contractors including planners, designers, superintendents, maintenance staff, concessioners and partners. All public comment will need to be entered in PEPC by 12/4/20.  The National Park Service Campground Development Guide has been posted on the Planning, Environment Public Comment (PEPC) page for public external review. This time can also be used for additional internal review. All comments should be posted on PEPC.  We would appreciate your review and input on the guide.  Project Page

Saturday is National Public Lands Day

Washington Trails Association

Saturday is National Public Lands Day, and this year it seems more important than ever to celebrate the outdoors. Our wild places and nearby green spaces have provided much needed solace during the coronavirus pandemic, and as a result, parks and trails are getting a lot more use. Now, it’s time to pay it back to our public lands by pitching in to pick up trash, protecting Icicle Canyon climbing areas, and speaking up for more outdoor recreation opportunities to meet increased demand. The smoke and wildfires of the past few weeks have weighed heavily on our hearts and minds. Hear about how wildfires and other effects of climate change are impacting the places we love - and what you can do to help - by attending a special conversation with Conrad Anker this Thursday. And with perhaps no place more affected by climate change than the Arctic, we also encourage you to learn more about our conservation imprint Braided River’s legacy of protecting this wild landscape through books and impact campaigns. -Betsy Robblee, Conservation and Advocacy Director

Thank you from Washington's outdoor community - Great American Outdoors Act

Produced by the Mountaineers

Washington's outdoor community thanks our WA congressional delegation for passing the Great American Outdoors Act! Thank you Senator Cantwell, Senator Patty Murray, Rep. Derek Kilmer, Rep. Suzan DelBene, Rep. Denny Heck, Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, Rep. Rick Larsen, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Rep. Kim Schrier, and Rep. Adam Smith. Thanks to your efforts, Washington communities, visitors, and businesses will benefit for years to come. You’ve made Washington proud! https://youtu.be/9Bp1xlIDkhw

New Report: Camping Could Save the Economy/Our Lives

The Stranger - by Batt Baume

So, you want to save Washington’s economy? Well then get out of town and go jump in a lake. A new report from Tacoma nonprofit Earth Economics shows that prior to the pandemic, people spent $26.5 billion on outdoor recreation in Washington; and with new research indicating that outdoor activities are much safer than indoor, investing in the state’s natural resources could help dig us out of the horrible economic catastrophe that’s looming over us all.

Today the Great American Outdoors Act was signed into law

BREAKING NEWS

The Great American Outdoors Act ends a history of underfunding the Land and Water Conservation Fund and not addressing the maintenance backlog on federal public lands - efforts that have been attempted in the past and have been unable to move through the legislative process. It provides $9.5 billion to address that backlog, and $900 million annually for the LWCF.

 

 

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