WE BELIEVE
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Matters.
WELCOME TO THE BIG TENT
The Umbrella Organization for the voice of Outdoor Recreation in Washington State.

The power of the Big Tent  lies not with any individual or with any shiny advertising or marketing campaigns, but with the combined weight of dozens of organizations and agencies who believe in the collective value of outdoor recreation. The Big Tent engages Washington leaders to view outdoor recreation as a sector, one which has catalyzed the economy in every nook and cranny of the state while contributing to active and healthy living choices for our citizens.

#RecreateResponsibly to Protect Yourself, Others, and the Outdoors

During this public health crisis, spending time in outdoor spaces has become even more important for many Americans. Yet these unusual circumstances mean that all of us, from seasoned outdoor enthusiasts to families heading out to their local park for the first time, could use a little guidance about how to stay safe. The Recreate Responsibly guidelines offer a starting point for getting outside to keep yourself healthy and to maintain access to our parks, trails, and beaches. [ LEARN MORE ]


 

SPONSORS

We Represent Outdoor Recreation

Washington State Parks - Legislative Update

By Daniel Farber, Policy and Governmental Affairs Director

The legislative session is of course off and running and a number of State Parks-related bills are already being considered.  See the links below for a summary of the most significant bills and the basic analysis of each bill by State Parks staff.  You can read any of the bills by going to http://app.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/ and typing in the bill number in the block provided.  If you have any questions or comments on the bills, feel free to contact me at any time and I’ll be happy to provide you whatever information I can and hear any thoughts you have about each bill.

Outdoor Recreation in Washington Generates $21.6 Billion Each Year

The Olympian

Washingtonians love to play outdoors, especially in local parks and public waters. That is the basic conclusion of a report released earlier this month that studied the effect outdoor recreation has on the state’s economy.  The study was done for the State Recreation and Conservation Office by Earth Economics in Tacoma. Requested by state Sen. Kevin Ranker (D-Orcas Island), this is the first comprehensive look at the state’s recreational economy.

Veteran of Idaho Wildlife Agency Named to Lead Washington's Fish and Wildlife Department

The Olympian

Jim Unsworth, who has spent more than 30 years with Idaho’s wildife agency, was chosen Saturday to head Washington’s Department of Fish and Wildlife. The 57-year-old Unsworth, who has been the deputy director of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, was chosen from four finalists by the state Fish and Wildlife Commission. The commission had interviewed eight candidates to take over for Phil Anderson, who announced in August he was resigning.

Expect Higher Fees, Limited Access to Popular Recreation Spots in 2015

The News Tribune

It’s the first weekend of the NFL playoffs, so the most pressing outdoor issue on your mind is probably, “Can I squeeze in a side trip to the Grand Canyon on the way to Glendale, Arizona, to watch the Seahawks play in the Super Bowl?”

Well, if you don’t do it now, you’ll pay for it later. The cost to visit national parks will likely increase by 67 percent in 2015.

Outdoor recreation in state yields $22 billion in spending

The Associated Press

— A new state study finds that people in Washington spend nearly $22 billion each year hiking, skiing, boating, golfing, and in other outdoor pursuits.

The report released Thursday estimates that residents spend on average about 56 days a year on outdoor recreational activities. And they spend money while doing so — on hotels, recreational equipment, food and other items.

Big Tent Beginnings

If you’re looking for the time the “Big Tent Outdoor Coalition” drew its first breath, leap back to Spring 2012.  We were fresh off legislative sessions where the Washington Wildlife & Recreation Program (WWRP) had to fight to survive in a 2011-13 biennial budget, and funding had been diverted from dedicated recreational accounts in the 2012 supplemental budget process.  I sat in a meeting room with Kaleen Cottingham, the Director of the Recreation & Conservation Office, wondering how outdoor recreation could grow a louder and more formative voice in the State Capital.

State Parks - Making Lemonade out of Budget Lemons‏

Governor Inslee released his proposed budget for the 2015-17 biennium.  After all the hoo-rah over the Governor’s Outdoor Recreation Task Force, after the Governor’s appeal to his Task Force for a plan for sufficient and sustainable funding for our state parks, I can only state that Governor Inslee’s proposed budget for State Parks is a major disappointment.

Governor's 2015-2017 Budget Proposal for State Parks

(A message from Director Hoch to State Parks staff)  The Governor rolled out his 2015-17 state Budget, with the theme, “Reinvesting in Washington.”  To balance his state Operating budget, he included $400 million in cuts and savings and additional proposed funding from new revenue sources.

RSS
First2425262728293032

Washington State's Outdoor Recreation Economy Generates

View the 2020 Economic Analysis of Outdoor Recreation in Washington State for details